Electronic Arts (EA) Become the Latest Victim of Online Hacking

Electronic Arts (EA), publisher of popular games like Battlefields, Apex Legends, and Madden NFL 21, is the latest victim of cyber hacking.

Home » Electronic Arts (EA) Become the Latest Victim of Online Hacking

Electronic Arts (EA), the publisher of popular games such as Battlefields, Apex Legends, and Madden NFL 21; is the latest victim of cyber hacking.

According to reports, the hackers grabbed around 780GB of data; and advertised the sale of the data on underground hacking forums.

The data also includes the source code of the FIFA 2021 game; as well as other crucial tools of the Frostbite engine, a program utilized by game creators. According to the forums, the company’s software development kits were also taken. According to press sources, the corporation is examining the data breach event.

Battlefield’s publisher stated they do not expect this incident

According to reports, the publisher of Battlefield does not expect this occurrence to have any impact on the game or its business. However, as soon as the news came, the company’s stock dropped by about 2.4 percent to $142.31.

The firm published a statement on the incident, stating that they are investigating a recent network penetration; in which a limited amount of game source code and related tools were stolen. The statement went on to say that no player data was accessed; and that there is no reason to assume that player privacy is in jeopardy.

Battlefield’s publisher denied the hack was a ransomware assault. In the past, ransomware attacks have happened in the gaming business. Capcom, the developer of Street Fighter and Resident Evil, was hit by a ransomware assault in November 2020. It is believed that this ransomware assault exposed the personal information of around 3,50,000 players.

CD Projekt Red, the developer of Cyberpunk 2077, was also hit by a ransomware assault. This incident occurred in February 2021; and it resulted in the theft of the source code for various games, which were then auctioned off online. Despite the lack of evidence, the hackers claimed that the data was sold for more than $7 million.

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